• Throughout the strike, sympathetic actions were held in cities and towns across the nation. This photo from the Library of Congress is of such a meeting in New York City. Unions, political parties, and sympathetic organizations would hold daily gatherings to keep each other updated on the events occurring in Lawrence. These assemblies often entailed the passing of resolutions, raising of funds to be sent to Lawrence strikers, and the organizing of acts of solidarity in their respective locales.

  • This is a photo from the Library of Congress depicting the arrival of strikers' children in New York City. As mentioned in the previous spread the workers of New York City were very interested in the events of the strike. When it was found out that strikers' children would be sent to New York during the "children's exodus", sympathetic New Yorkers jumped at the chance to have the honor of hosting a Lawrence child. A crowd of a thousand people met the strikers' children at Grand Central Station and led a solidarity parade through the streets of the city.

  • Area colleges and universities played competing roles in aiding and opposing the strike of 1912. The president of Harvard gave students the permission to serve in their local militia companies on strike duty in Lawrence during final exams. Harvard students who were absent for a final exam due to their service with the militia were automatically awarded a C in their school marks.

  • Another shot of one of many strike meetings that took place in New York in 1912 concerned with the Lawrence strike. The fact that people in other cities looked to Lawrence with baited breath is a testament to just how groundbreaking the strike of 1912 was. Lawrence was put on the map and people across the world waited to see how the Lawrence strike turned out. It's result caused a great swell in the confidence of the American labor movement.