• This is a portrait of Father James T. O'Reilly. Father O'Reilly was perhaps the most influential church leader in the history of Lawrence. He led the Catholic population of Lawrence as the head of Saint Mary's church, the largest Catholic church in Lawrence and one that is still standing today. He helped create separate Catholic churches for Greeks, Syrians, Portuguese and Lithuanians.

  • Elizabeth Gurley Flynn was a labor leader, activist, and feminist who played a leading role in the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW). Born in Concord, New Hampshire in 1890, her family moved to New York in 1900, and she was educated at the local public schools. Her parents introduced her to socialism. When she was 16 she gave her first speech, "What Socialism Will Do for Women", at the Harlem Socialist Club. Flynn was expelled from high school for her political activities. Author Theodore Dreiser described her as "an East Side Joan of Arc".

  • "A considerable number of the boys and girls die within the first two or three years after beginning work," wrote Lawrence physician Dr. Elizabeth Shapleigh. "Thirty of every 100 of all men and women who work in the mills die before or by the time they are 25 years of age". Many of the workers in the woolen mills of Lawrence and in the textile industry elsewhere were young girls. Young women were recruited for employment by mill owners, many of whom believed that girls and women would provide a malleable workforce and were naturally disposed to textile work.

  • This is a portrait of John Breen courtesy of the Lawrence History Center. He was the son of John Breen, Lawrence's first Irish-American mayor. An undertaker by trade and an ex-alderman, Breen also served on the Lawrence School Committee at the time of the strike. John Breen was arrested on Monday morning January 29, 1912 and accused of planting dynamite in three locations that were popular strikers' meeting places. Upon discovery of the dynamite, strikers were arrested but quickly exonerated when police examined the newspaper used to wrap the dynamite.

  • The American Woolen Company, established in 1899 under the leadership of William M. Wood and his father-in-law Frederick Ayer through the consolidation of eight financially troubled New England woolen mills, at its height in the 1920s owned and operated sixty woolen mills across New England. A clear product of the era of trusts, American Woolen’s business was routinely protected by Congress with the passage of high tariffs to keep foreign competition at bay.

  • This is a photo showing (from left to right) Joseph Caruso, Joseph Ettor, and Arturo Giovannitti. If you look closely you'll notice that the three men are handcuffed to each other. This photo was taken while they were still in custody on the charges of murder and inciting a riot. Ettor's characteristic grin can be found in almost every photo of him, including this one. Caruso was a very active Italian-American striker. Ettor and Giovannitti were chief organizers for the I.W.W. and rushed to Lawrence at the onset of the strike.

  • The “Committee of Ten” was a group composed of nine Lawrence textile workers and Joseph Ettor of the Industrial Workers of the World. This committee was charged with the responsibility of conducting negotiations with the textile corporations. With the arrest of Joseph Ettor on January 30, 1912, more responsibility fell on the remaining nine, of the Committee of Ten, to maintain the momentum of the strike, solidarity of the strikers, and conduct negotiations with the corporations, most notably the American Woolen Company.